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Situation Critical: How to Help Your Dog Survive Poisoning

Your dog can be poisoned by various poisonous plants, chemicals, and foods. Common sources of dog poisoning include the bathroom cupboard, the backyard, rotting food consumed during a walk, and stolen or dumped human food from the kitchen counter or table. Regardless of the toxin or origin, here are the steps you must immediately take to help your dog survive.

Determine the Poison

Attempt to identify the toxin and how your dog was exposed to it so you can provide your veterinarian with as much information as possible. Nonetheless, if your dog appears ill and/or you are unsure how long ago the exposure happened, get treatment immediately to prevent sickness from worsening. Early intervention can save many toxic exposures, especially if they are eliminated before too much time has elapsed. Your reliable veterinary surgucal specialist may be able to identify the ingested poison based on the physical exam and laboratory results.

 

If you or a family member have the time, ascertain whether the exposure was from ingestion, inhalation, or touch. Was the plant dangerous? Could the food have been poisonous? Is it possible that your dog interacted with a different species, such as a toad? Was it a harmful chemical or treatment for humans? Determine the amount of poison your dog ingested, breathed, or was exposed to. Obtain the original package of the poison.

Seek Professional Assistance

Even if your dog performs normally, you should get veterinary medical care. It may be too late to wait until your dog becomes ill before seeking treatment. Never provide a home cure or other treatment to your dog without first seeing a veterinarian.

 

If your family veterinarian’s office is open, make an appointment with them first. You should contact a local veterinary emergency center if the poisoning occurs after hours. A veterinarian can guide how to proceed. The type of toxin exposure will dictate the appropriate response. If you still don’t have an emergency vet, visit this link.

Prepare for an Emergency

If you need to visit a new veterinarian facility, keep your dog’s medical documents, including immunization history, current prescriptions, food and drug allergies, identification, and other critical items, in an easily accessible spot. Also, ensure that your dog wears a collar with an identification tag and that a leash is kept near the entrance so that it can be quickly grabbed on the way out.

 

Even if you do not suspect poisoning, you should generally call a veterinarian facility if your dog becomes ill. Symptoms of toxicity may not manifest for several hours or days. Signs, such as fatigue or loss of appetite, can be vague. Severe symptoms of toxicity include convulsions, collapse, and trouble breathing which hopefully wont lead to dog or cat euthanasia

Prevention Is Better Than Cure

Do all in your power to avoid exposure to poisons in the first place. Keep hazardous materials, such as garbage, out of your dog’s reach. Whenever feasible, use pet-safe items in your home and yard. Care should be taken not to drop potentially hazardous food products during cooking. Choose plants and flowers that are pet-friendly for your house and yard. Prevention is the most efficient method of dog protection. However, regardless of precaution, toxicities can still develop. You now have access to helpful information and resources should your dog be exposed.

 

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